Aquaculture Magazine

Contributions

  • The IMBY Inside

    Octuber-Novembrer 2016 issue

    At a recent meeting with US government officials, I was asked, “why don’t you work more in the US”?

  • The magic word... Aquaculture

    Octuber-Novembrer 2016 issue

    Through the website ‘LinkedIn’ I learned that 115 ‘ocean leaders’ recently sent a letter to the leading US presidential candidates and to date they have received only one reply – from Secretary Clinton, who released a two-page response.
    We learned from this posting that ‘the ocean leaders’ who sent the letter include CEOs of seafood companies and other businesses, directors of major science labs, aquariums, diving organizations, well-known ocean explorers, authors, artists, ocean conservationists, members of Congress and former heads of the EPA and NOAA.

  • Aquaponics is AgTech and AgTech is booming. The question is, are we ready?

    Octuber-Novembrer 2016 issue

    The other day Aquaculture Magazine editor Dr. Greg Lutz posted an intriguing article from the “Beef Central” website. “Aquaculture shapes as beef’s big protein threat, says financial guru.” The thesis was that between 1969 and 2009, global per capita animal protein had increased from 38 kg to 60 kg and that seafood was now the largest source of it at 160 million metric tonnes (mt) annually, leaving beef a bit in the dust at only 68 mt.

  • The Luther H. Blount Shellfish Hatchery of Rhode Island

    Octuber-Novembrer 2016 issue

    In my home state of Rhode Island, aquaculture of molluscan shellfish, particularly American oysters, Crassostrea virginica has been a growing business concern since the mid-1990s, when the state legislature took up the task of revising the aquaculture laws, streamlining the permitting process.

  • The harmful algal bloom last summer had a major impact on the Chilean salmon industry

    Octuber-Novembrer 2016 issue

    A mass mortality of salmon and trout in cage farms in Chile during last February – March was frequently described in international media. Some sources wrongly called the incident a ‘red tide’ – it was actually blooming of so-called ichthyotoxic algae that caused the huge mortality (German Merino, pers. comm.)

  • Sustainable feeds IS THERE A CORN/SOY DIET FOR AQUACULTURE?

    Octuber-Novembrer 2016 issue

    Producing high quality animal protein at minimal cost has been a goal of humans for millennia, and a promise from kings and politicians for over 400 years.

  • Recent news from around the globe by Aquafeed.com Going with the grain

    Octuber-Novembrer 2016 issue

    These are some of the highlights of the past few weeks at Aquafeed.com

  • News from the Aquaculture Stewardship Council

    Octuber-Novembrer 2016 issue

    Spending on certified seafood products with the Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) logo in Dutch supermarkets has increased 150 per cent in the year between 2014 and 2015, according to market research by IRI.

  • Genes Change...or, Concerns Over Genetic Sustainability

    Octuber-Novembrer 2016 issue

    Genes change. This, of course, is the basis of evolution.  And it often allows populations and species to persist when their environments change either abruptly or over time.  Individual genes can change from one generation to the next through mutation.  Relative frequencies of genes within a population can change due to any number of factors, from natural selection to population isolation to domestication pressures in an artificial setting.  These genetic changes are often a cause for concern, especially when interactions between captive and wild populations of aquatic species are considered.

  • Latin America Report: Recent News and Events

    Octuber-Novembrer 2016 issue

    China and Mexico have signed a cooperation agreement with the aim of promoting aquaculture and fishery development through the exchange of specialists and technicians, and to establish common health protocols in order to achieve smoother trade between the two countries.

  • A Review of the European Union Aquaculture Industry

    Octuber-Novembrer 2016 issue

    While the European Union (EU) is an important seafood consumer, it currently meets most of its consumption needs with imports from Asia and Latin America. Although European aquaculture production has decreased in recent years, its great potential for food production and its contribution to the EU’s economy have been recently recognized, and this has led to the generation of strategies for the sustainable development of the industry.

  • Updates from Urner Barry

    August- September 2016 issue

    Through April, the salmon market continued the year 10.44 percent higher YTD. Total month-to-month data, however, reveals a decrease of 10.41 percent when compared to March.

  • Updates from Urner Barry

    August- September 2016 issue

    Overall tilapia imports were down in April as it is seasonally expected. However, when compared to April 2015, imports were up 7.4 percent led by frozen fillets shipments. On a YTD basis tilapia imports were down over 12 percent.

  • Shrimp Import Updates from Urner Barry

    August- September 2016 issue

    April shrimp imports revealed what many have been expecting, a sharp decline in imports from the major producing countries including India and Indonesia.

  • Seafood in the social media world

    August- September 2016 issue

    The world is rapidly changing. Just how quickly is our industry, and more importantly your business, moving in order to survive in the ‘new age’?

  • Transitioning Your Aquaculture Farm Business to a New Generation

    August- September 2016 issue

    This column presents the contents of a webinar hosted by the National Aquaculture Association in November, 2015.


  • Possible advantages & disadvantages of sterile salmon and trout in commercial farming

    August- September 2016 issue

    Farmed fish are often detected in rivers with wild stocks of salmon and trout. In Scotland, 14 out of 16 rivers in the northwestern region contained salmon of mixed farm origin according to a study performed more than ten years ago.

  • Overview of HACCP Requirements for a Warehouse that Stores Refrigerated or Frozen Seafood

    August- September 2016 issue

    What is Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP)? HACCP is a management tool used to protect the food supply against biological, chemical and physical hazards.

  • Recent news from around the globe by Aquafeed.com Going with the grain

    August- September 2016 issue

    Evonik scientists, along with much of the feed industry, are trying to turn salmon, shrimp, and other marine animals into vegetarians.

  • Aquaculture Stewardship Council – setting global standards for responsible farming

    August- September 2016 issue

    As aquaculture grows, so too does its impact on the environment and local communities.Seafood is one of the most popular sources of protein in the world and aquaculture is the fastest growing food production system in the world. Now, more than half of the fish consumed globally is farmed. Farms that are not well managed can have negative impacts on environment and local communities, but meeting seafood demand can be done responsibly.

  • On-line Resources from the AFS Fish Health Section

    August- September 2016 issue

    The Fish Health Section (FHS) is one of the largest and most international sections of the American Fisheries Society. The FHS was formed in 1972 to give fish biologists, diagnosticians, researchers, aquaculturists, veterinarians, administrators, and others involved in fish health, an organization for communication and interaction.

  • The use of RAS in marine fish hatcheries – what to be aware of

    August- September 2016 issue

    The use of recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) is growing rapidly in many areas of the fish farming sector with capacities varying from huge plants generating many tons of fish per year for consumption to small sophisticated systems used for restocking or preserving endangered species.

  • There’s (still) a lot of talk out there about open ocean aquaculture…

    August- September 2016 issue

    In April, the Offshore Mariculture Conference convened in Barcelona. Here was a two-day event, focused wholly and solely on that sector most near and dear to our hearts.

  • Chile - The Chilean Fund for Fisheries and Aquaculture Research (FIPA) offers grants totaling 1 million USD for 10 new projects in fisheries and aquaculture research

    August- September 2016 issue

    A total of 190 tons of Bluefin tuna were released into the Pacific Ocean in joint agreement between CONAPESCA and the Mexican company Baja Aqua Farms on June 25th. 

  • US$3.2 million to support ecologically sustainable development of aquaculture in Zanzibar

    August- September 2016 issue

    The Technical Cooperation Project, titled: “Creating Aquaculture Enterprise for Youth Employment, Poverty Reduction and Food Security,” is meant to build the capacity of 600 vulnerable youths in aquaculture development in Margibi, Grand Bassa, Grand Cape Mount and Bomi Counties. 

  • Drought impacts in Vietnam

    August- September 2016 issue

    WorldFish collaborates with DoF at the Jitra Aquaculture Extension Center, in Kedah, Malaysia, to run research activities and to serve as a nucleus breeding center for Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia (GIFT), the fast-growing strain of tilapia developed by WorldFish. 

  • Antimicrobials in Aquaculture – Research Opportunities

    June/July 2016 issue

    The use of antibiotics and other compounds in aquaculture has been under scrutiny for several decades now, and is a common topic when the industry is subject to broad-brush criticism in the media.

  • Aquaponics’ next frontier: Urban Agriculture

    June/July 2016 issue

    “As to methods there may be a million and then some, but principles are few. The man who grasps principles can successfully select his own methods. The man who tries methods, ignoring principles, is sure to have trouble.” —Harrington Emerson.

  • Brown trout and sea trout: a prospective species for aquaculture?

    June/July 2016 issue

    The species Salmo trutta L. represents two major morphs, Brown trout (S. trutta fario) and Sea trout (S. trutta trutta).

  • The Road Ahead for Aquaculture Products in the US Market

    June/July 2016 issue

    The presence of slavery and forced labor in the seafood industry has been brought out of the shadows in high-profile media reports during the past two years with questions raised about the sale of these products in the U.S. An arcane provision in Customs law from 1930, known as the consumptive demand exception, allowed products and commodities made with forced or coercive labor practices to be imported when domestic production or supply in the U.S. was insufficient to meet “consumptive demands” of the United States. However, recent changes in the statute have brought an end to this provision.

  • Recent news from around the globe by Aquafeed.com Feed companies support African aquaculture expansion

    June/July 2016 issue

    The promise of expanded aquaculture production in Africa has been underscored by substantial investment in the continent by two of Europe’s biggest aquafeed producers.

  • Aquaculture of Exotic Shellfish Species

    June/July 2016 issue

    The issue of aquaculture of non-native or exotic shellfish species is periodically raised at times when the industry becomes distressed, or stocks of the native species become depressed, or the industry begins teetering on the edge of economic viability.

  • There’s a lot of talk out there about open ocean aquaculture…

    June/July 2016 issue

    It’s always exciting to talk about possibilities, and to then share ideas and opinions as they take shape, and start to come to fruition. It’s what we humans do… what we have always done: we identify challenges, then imagine how they might be better resolved, and then, if we work hard, and don’t mess up, and a little luck falls our way, we can watch them become reality.

  • China Invests Heavily in US Soybean Export Council’s Technology Improvements for Pond Aquaculture

    June/July 2016 issue

    The Chinese government, together with private aquaculture producers, invested roughly $10 million in 2015 for Intensive Pond Aquaculture (IPA) technology, according to the International Soy in Aquaculture Program of the U.S. Soybean Export Council (USSEC). That investment is expected to double to $20 million in 2016.

  • Largest Event Delivers in Indonesia

    June/July 2016 issue

    The next WAS-APC event in 2017 will be held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.


  • There’s more to sustainability than dumping fishmeal

    April / May 2016 issue

    The fact that environmental footprint is now a major factor in protein production, and that feed plays an important part was underscored at the start of the year by the launch by the European, U.S. and Canadian feed industry associations of the Global Feed LCA Institute (GFLI).

  • Salmon losses blamed on “harmful algae” reach nearly 90,000 tons

    April / May 2016 issue

    By Saturday, March 5, according to information provided by impacted companies, the loss estimates had risen to about 20 million fish, equivalent to 85,000 tons of Atlantic salmon. 

  • Fish grown smart Keep an eye on AquaSmart

    April / May 2016 issue

    The tool helps companies to gain insight into already available production data and is completely free, without any restrictions or limitations. 

  • Salmon

    April / May 2016 issue

    Currently the farmed salmon complex ranges depending on the market. February thus far has seen the Northeast wholefish market been steady while the West Coast wholefish market has been firm on smaller fish and weaker on larger fish. The Chilean fillet market has been steady to full steady.

  • Tilapia, Catfish and Shrimp Import Updates from Urner Barry

    April / May 2016 issue

    Total tilapia imports into the U.S. in 2015 declined when compared to the previous year for both fresh and frozen fillets. Conversely, frozen wholefish imports increased 3.5 percent.

  • How Engaged Are you?

    April / May 2016 issue

    Many people seem to arrive in the seafood industry more by accident than design and very few look outside the small circle that they operate.

  • Why Fish Quality Deteriorates During Storage – and What You Can Do About It

    April / May 2016 issue

    Deleterious changes in the quality of the lipid (fat) in marine fish during frozen storage is also caused by a combination of dehydration, ice crystal formation, and increased extracellular salt concentrations in fish fat (lipid).

  • Growing Your Aquaculture Business: Is It Time to Expand or Diversify?

    April / May 2016 issue

    This column presents the contents of a webinar hosted by the National Aquaculture Association in November, 2015.  The slides and recording of that webinar are available at:

    HTTP://THENAA.NET/WEBINARS/GROWING-YOUR-AQUACULTURE-BUSINESS-EXPANDING-OR-DIVERSIFYING

  • Water footprint – the next truly wicked problem in nutrition?

    April / May 2016 issue

    The first truly wicked problem in aquaculture nutrition was fish meal; a great ingredient, but finite supply, increased demand, resulted in increasing price.

  • Carbonate Chemistry Games for Aquaculture: Alkalinity

    April / May 2016 issue

    In the last column, we looked at the basic carbonate chemistry in all its forms from CO2 in the gas phase to CO2 dissolved in water to hydrated CO2 as H2CO3, which can then ionize into HCO3- and CO3-2, depending upon the pH. How much, of which forms, of inorganic CO2 exists in the water is related to the alkalinity and pH of the water.

  • Can we really ever know what customers want?

    February/March 2016 issue

    The New Year commences and the media fills the vacant spaces with lots of predicted trends for the season ahead and people fill their minds with new hopes.

  • Shrimp Aquaculture Certification:The Way Forward Part 2

    February/March 2016 issue

    The World Wildlife Fund suggested seven indicators – land use, water use, feed conversion ratio (FCR), survival, wild fish inclusion in feeds, dissolved oxygen in receiving waters and energy use – as a means of assessing resource use and negative environmental impacts of aquaculture production facilities. Preliminary results from a survey of shrimp farms in Vietnam and Thailand reveal that these indicators can provide an objective accounting of resource use and negative environmental impacts – including acquisition of the information necessary for estimating embodied burdens. Our discussion from the previous issue continues here.

  • Challenges and prospects for wild Atlantic salmon stocks

    February/March 2016 issue

    For many decades, there has been serious concern about the status of wild salmon stocks on both sides of the Atlantic.

  • Water Quality and the Culture of Shellfish in Prohibited Waters

    February/March 2016 issue

    In the United States, water quality standards for shellfishing and shellfish aquaculture waters have been governed since 1925 by the National Shellfish Sanitation Program (NSSP) first administered by the United States Public Health Service.

  • Finally! A Final Rule. So, is this is the End of the Beginning?

    February/March 2016 issue

    There was little real fanfare – Kathleen Sullivan, the head of NOAA, held a press conference in New Orleans, and announced that NOAA was going to move forward with implementing the Rule for the Fisheries Management Plan (FMP) for aquaculture in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). They’d be ready to start moving forward in February. Those stalwarts of seafood internet news services – Intrafish.com, Seafood Source.com, and a few others – scattered the story out amongst the ether.

  • Water Supply, Distribution and Management Considerations in Freshwater Hatcheries

    February/March 2016 issue

    Much of the popular literature on hatchery development and operation focuses on marine species and facilities, but in this column we will consider some key factors for freshwater hatcheries.

  • Recent news from around the globe by Aquafeed.com Investment in feed production

    February/March 2016 issue

    If investment in aquafeed production is an indicator of the health of aquaculture, the industry is thriving. In the last weeks of 2015, we reported a number of developments, covering feed production in Europe, Asia Pacific and Africa.

  • IFC Approves Loan to Omarsa to Promote Export Sector in Ecuador

    February/March 2016 issue

    The International Finance Corporation (IFC), the private sector arm of the World Bank Group, provided a loan of US$10 million to Operadora y Procesadora de Productos Marinos Omarsa S.A., one of the biggest shrimp export businesses in Ecuador, to assist it with its expansion plans.

  • Vietnam Pangasius Industry Still Facing Difficult Times

    February/March 2016 issue

    After one year of implementation of “Decree 36,” most farmers have not escaped the vicious circle of market forces and Pangasius has yet to regain its previous competitive position.

  • Recent news from around the globe by Aquafeed.com

    December/ January 2016 issue

    These are some of the highlights of the past few weeks at Aquafeed.com

  • Carbonate Chemistry Games for Aquaculture:The Basics

    December/ January 2016 issue

    Almost four decades ago, I got an interesting introduction to carbon dioxide in aquaculture from a presentation by Dr. John Colt who explained in great detail how, “if you put fish in a closed bag with pure oxygen, the fish will not die of ammonia toxicity, but from CO2 toxicity”.

  • Shrimp Aquaculture Certification: The Way Forward Part 1

    December/ January 2016 issue

    Shrimp aquaculture certification has grown rapidly during the past few years, and an increasing percentage of farmed shrimp sold in supermarkets and restaurants is certified.

  • Steps in the Process of Developing a Strategic Marketing Plan

    December/ January 2016 issue

    The first step towards developing a strategic marketing plan is to set specific goals for both the short and the long-term.

  • RNAi in shrimp immune defense system

    December/ January 2016 issue

    Winning the battles against infectious disease outbreaks remains as the ultimate goal, and drive, for continuous efforts seeking effective means of disease control in shrimp aquaculture.

  • What’s on Your Wish List?

    December/ January 2016 issue

    After months of planning and preparation, we recently hosted a 3-day workshop entitled “Larval Feeds and Feeding Strategies for Marine Fish”.

  • Latin American Report Recent News and Events

    December/ January 2016 issue

    While it seems individual countries will have to cope with EMS on their own terms, there are new examples of bilateral cooperation in aquaculture development in various countries.

  • Europe Report

    December/ January 2016 issue

    Since the time of ancient Egypt, followed closely by the Romans and the Greeks, the meaning of Aquaculture has always been widely understood in the Mediterranean.

  • Epigenetics and Fish Nutrition – Part 2

    December/ January 2016 issue

    “There is always so much talk about the sins of the fathers, but it is the sins of the mothers that are the most difficult to avoid repeating”. MELANIE BENJAMIN, ALICE I HAVE BEEN, 2010

  • Filter Feeding Bivalves as Processors of Coastal Waters

    October/November 2015 issue

    Bivalves have a profound role in controlling the boom & bust cycles of seasonal phytoplankton blooms, and the increased rates of sediment deposition to the bottom by bivalves are an important “coupler” between the water column and the bottom that stimulates the rates of decomposition and other processes in the sediments.

  • Recent news from around the globe by Aquafeed.com

    October/November 2015 issue

    More consolidation in the aquafeed sector

  • The importance of traceability

    October/November 2015 issue

    Your company has sent out the first big order of shrimp to a new customer. Everything was perfectly controlled relative to the size of the headed and deveined shrimp falling within an agreed count per pound, the shrimp were chilled to 0.5 ˚C within an hour of harvest; packed with plenty of ice and gel packs and at the airport in time for the air freight departure. Four days later, the customer is very angry and rejects the shipment. What could have gone wrong?

  • With CoOL – be careful what you wish for

    October/November 2015 issue

    Every country has a sense of pride and, if given the opportunity, people will say that their country produces better product than any another. Given a question in a survey of ‘what country produces the best product’ people will nominate their own – surely that is human nature.

  • Tilapia: Options for Selection Programs

    October/November 2015 issue

    In order to be effective in the process of genetic “improvement,” we need some heritable (additive) genetic variation to work with, the luxury of being able to cull most of the population on hand when choosing breeding stock to produce the next generation, and some way to accurately determine (or at least estimate) the genetic “worth” of individual animals. 

  • Improving the sustainability of salmon and trout farming

    October/November 2015 issue

    The salmonid sector is frequently accused of not being especially environmentally friendly, exploiting limited food resources such as fish meal and oil, discharging large quantities of feed losses and organic wastes, spreading diseases and parasites, not preventing fish escapes, etc. etc. etc. No smoke without fire, but in general the situation has strongly improved over the last decades due to imposed strict governmental regulations and, not least, better management. and control systems, and more environment-conscious farmers.

  • A Mess of Mesh, or a Web of Wonder? New marvels protect against ‘net losses’ in open ocean aquaculture

    October/November 2015 issue

    One of the fundamental principles of open ocean aquaculture is to keep the sharks on one side of the netting, and the fish on the other.

  • Latin American Report Recent News and Events

    October/November 2015 issue

    On May 28, 2015, Undercurrent News reported that a Research Associate at the University of Arizona stated that shrimp sampled in 2013 and 2014 from 3 farms in two Central American countries had tested positive for EMS

  • Salmon lice are a real threat to aquaculture and wild fish populations

    August/September 2015 issue

    Attached to the host, the lice use their rasping mouth to graze and remove mucus, skin and tissue. Strongly attacked host fish may lose their appetite and growth, and the stress and wounds expose fish to secondary infections.

  • Essential ingredient to a successful world – SEAFOOD!

    August/September 2015 issue

    Last year I went to a United Nations FAO Committee on Fisheries (COFI) meeting in Bergen, Norway which was totally focused on fish trade. It made me think how important the seafood industry is yet how little it actually is involved in its destiny.

  • Specific Pathogen Free Penaeus vannamei Breeding Program at University of Guam

    August/September 2015 issue

    The Guam Aquaculture Development and Training Center made a strategic decision in 2007 to develop Specific-Pathogen-Free (SPF), genetically-improved shrimp.

  • Production of Atlantic halibut in Norway

    August/September 2015 issue

    Atlantic halibut (Hipoglossus hipoglossus L.) is a large, right side-eyed flatfish whose population distributes throughout the northern part of the Atlantic Ocean, along the coast of Norway, Iceland and the Faroes.

  • Strategic Market Planning for Aquaculture Businesses Engle-Stone Aquatic$ LLC

    August/September 2015 issue

    Seafood markets have traditionally been dynamic, given that historically much of the seafood supplied was based on what fishermen could catch from the wild.

  • Reporting Our Way to Irrelevancy

    August/September 2015 issue

    How does one measure success? Ask a lawyer and it would be the number of cases argued successfully and the importance of those cases. Ask a car salesman and it would be the number of cars sold and the relative value of those cars.


  • Epigenetics and Fish Nutrition– Part 1

    August/September 2015 issue

    “Research is to see what everybody else has seen, and to think what nobody else has thought,”  Albert Szent-Gyorgyi

  • Recent news from around the globe by Aquafeed.com

    August/September 2015 issue

    These are some of the highlights of the past few weeks at Aquafeed.com

  • The Nitrogen Game III – anammox games

    August/September 2015 issue

    As researchers continued to look at mass balances of N in natural systems, it slowly became clear that bacteria feeding on ammonia + nitrite as an energy source were busy turning CO2 into biomass (Thamdrup and Dalsgaard, 2002, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 68, 1312-1318).

  • Thanks be to soy

    June/ July 2015 issue

    The next time that you are sufficiently lucky to be sitting down to a bowl of tofu, or platter of edamame, or… if you are particularly lucky… to a fillet of delicious, nutritious, soy-fed fish, then I would urge you to please spare a moment, to bow your head, and… if you are so inclined… offer a quiet word of gratitude to the Great Whomsoever-to-Whom-you-whisper-your-deepest-secrets-and-desires.

  • Farming of Arctic charr Still Represents a Small Part of Global Salmonid Aquaculture

    June/ July 2015 issue

    Aquaculture of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) has faced some problems, such as temporary disease problems (BKD in Iceland) and marginal profitability. Consequently, the global production has not increased much in recent years.

  • Natural Resources and Aquaculture

    June/ July 2015 issue

    Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime but what if there were no more fish? What if there were no more land to raise grains to make bread? What if there were no more water to irrigate crops? What is more important than food? The natural resources used to produce food.

  • New Dietary Recommendations for Consuming Aquacultured Species

    June/ July 2015 issue

    For over 50 years, there have been recommendations to limit dietary cholesterol as a means to prevent high levels of cholesterol in the blood.

  • Vibrios and Shellfish

    June/ July 2015 issue

    On the last installment of The Shellfish Corner I provided a rationale for the existence of nationally-mandated shellfish sanitation programs as a major driver of the growing popularity and demand for oysters and other molluscan shellfish. 

  • Stock Replenishment of Marine Fishes as a Springboard to Commercialization?

    June/ July 2015 issue

    Historically, the “secrets” to culturing many of the fishes currently reared in the U.S. were unlocked through efforts to replenish or enhance wild populations for the benefit of commercial and recreation fishermen.In many cases this culture capacity went on to fuel successful aquaculture ventures because the fish were obviously valued – not only for sport but also as food. Unlike other parts of the world, in the U.S. there are only a handful of organizations culturing marine fish for stock replenishment. I recently reached out to some of those groups to see what species they were culturing and what interest, if any, was being exhibited by the commercial sector for farming applications.

  • Recent news from around the globe by Aquafeed.com

    June/ July 2015 issue

    “China is the world’s largest aquaculture market and Tongwei holds the leading position as a feed supplier to the aquaculture industry in China”, Carlos Diaz, CEO of the BioMar Group.

  • News release on Latin American

    June/ July 2015 issue

    At least 200 tons of tilapia were left dead due to abnormal conditions in the Betania reservoir. Some loss estimates range as high as 1000 tons.

  • The Nitrogen Game Part 2 – Nitrate

    April / May 2015 issue

    In part 1 of the Nitrogen Game, we covered the fact that when you add fish feed to an aquaculture system, part of that feed is excreted by the fish/shrimp/etc. as ammonia nitrogen that can be a highly toxic waste product. 

  • News release on Latin American

    April / May 2015 issue

    Center for Fisheries Technology Innovation (CFTI) Will Serve to Promote Peruvian Aquaculture

  • Microalgae role in Mediterranean Hatcheries

    April / May 2015 issue

    Artificial feeds do not yet offer any real advantage over live food organisms for rearing many species of marine fish larvae. 

  • World and U.S. Demand and Supply Relationships for Seafood: Implications for Aquaculture Producers

    April / May 2015 issue

    The previous Aquaculture Economics, Management and Marketing columns discussed various aspects of aquaculture profitability. There are four main ways to increase profitability of aquaculture businesses: increase production, decrease cost, maintain or increase market price, and expand market demand for aquaculture products. This column discusses global supply and demand for seafood products, and explores possible ways to expand markets for aquaculture products. 

  • Recent news from around the globe by Aquafeed.com

    April / May 2015 issue

    These are some of the highlights of the past few weeks at Aquafeed.com


  • Flat Sales – What we need to do

    April / May 2015 issue

    There are many factors that play roles in trends of flat seafood consumption.  From a consumer’s perspective these range from how easy it is to purchase (availability), to value for money (price), to convenience of preparation/cooking and overall satisfaction of the taste (quality).

  • Leave Me Alone

    April / May 2015 issue

    “The more laws, the less justice.” Marcus Tullius Cicero (106 BC)

  • Preventative Medicine Strategies: Vaccination

    April / May 2015 issue

    When the topic of vaccinating fish comes up, invariably the question from the fish farmer is: “Yes, but does it work?”

  • Current status of shrimp diseases in Asia

    April / May 2015 issue

    Excerpt from Thirteenth Meeting of the Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health NETWORK OF AQUACULTURE CENTRES IN ASIA-PACIFIC 28 February 2015


  • Recent news from around the globe by Aquafeed.com

    February/March 2015 issue

    These are some of the highlights of the past few weeks at Aquafeed.com

  • Shellfish Sanitation and the Price of Shellfish

    February/March 2015 issue

    The differences in sanitary water quality in the Philippine, Gambian and Rhode Island shellfish growing estuaries got us to thinking about how shellfish consumers might be perceiving consumption of oysters and other shellfish as a health risk and how much this perception affects the price of the oysters in the United States.

  • Genetic Improvement Considerations for Small Producers

    February/March 2015 issue

    A review of aquaculture industry publications over the past decade might suggest that much of the expansion in global production has been attributable to high-profile, large- scale, highly capitalized operations.

  • Larval Nutrition

    February/March 2015 issue

    Investing in early childhood nutrition is a surefire strategy. The returns are incredibly high. Anne M. Mulcahy.

  • Yellowtail and Bass Farming Soon to be a Reality Off the Coast of California?

    February/March 2015 issue

    Rose Canyon Fisheries (RCF) – a unique collaboration between a scientific research institute and a private investment group dedicated to pioneering environmentally sustainable, domestic, offshore aquaculture – has filed permit applications for a 5,000-metric-ton finfish farm several miles off the San Diego coast.

  • New Zealand Predominates Farming of King salmon

    February/March 2015 issue

    The significant producer at present is New Zealand representing 15 – 20 thousand tons per year.

  • Recent news from around the glxobe by Aquafeed.com

    December /January 2015 issue

    The project GreenFeed has developed a method to produce single cell proteins from a residual stream from the forestry industry for use in aquafeed.

  • Creating a retail development model

    December /January 2015 issue

    I saw this happen on the weekend, and not for the first time. Consumer at retail fishmongers and the discussion went like this:

  • The culture of Amazonian fishes and freshwater prawns as diversification alternatives for rural aquaculture

    December /January 2015 issue

    Fish culture holds great possibilities to contribute to food security and the reduction of malnutrition in rural regions throughout South America.

  • Portuguese caviar

    December /January 2015 issue

    Sea urchin roe is a gourmet food product, with sushi and sashimi representing the biggest business opportunity.

  • Liming Ponds

    December /January 2015 issue

    Ponds with soft, acid water may not respond to fertilizer. This is usually the result of soil conditions at the bottom of the pond – since clay soils tend to be acidic. If pond water does not turn green after six weeks of fertilization, then liming may be necessary.

  • Prebiotics in Shrimp Aquaculture

    December /January 2015 issue

    Improving the overall health status of the stock and defending against various infectious pathogens’ intrusion has been on the top of the list of shrimp aquaculture priorities.

  • Profitability of an Aquaculture Business: Are You Evaluating It Correctly?

    December /January 2015 issue

    “Profitability” is a word that is used commonly, and most individuals understand generally what it means.

  • Grass Fed Fish

    December /January 2015 issue

    The Aquaculture industry, other than for shellfish, is completely dependent on the animal feed industry that sustains it.

  • An audacious hope – to be able to grow fish in the Gulf of Mexico!

    December /January 2015 issue

    Much deferred, now nigh fulfilled?

     

  • Triploidy – Background and Rationle

    October / November 2014 issue

    A key feature in the formation of eggs and sperm in virtually all the aquatic species one might wish to culture involves a halving of the number of chromosomes (and therefor the genetic material) through a process called meiosis.

  • The complexity of nutrition

    October / November 2014 issue

    “Fools ignore complexity. Pragmatists suffer it. Some can avoid it. Geniuses remove it”, Alan J. Perlis.

  • Shellfish and the Problem of Ocean Acidification

    October / November 2014 issue

    Over that last two decades there has been growing concern by the scientific community about global carbon dioxide emissions.

  • If it were easy, everyone would be doing it!

    October / November 2014 issue

    As I read the last issue of Aquaculture Magazine with great interest, I couldn’t help but notice that marine fish culture was very well represented, including the cover photo of some tasty yellowtail!

  • The Nitrogen Game – Part 1

    October / November 2014 issue

    We’ll continue discussing the importance of water quality management in aquaculture.

  • Recent news from around the globe by Aquafeed.com

    October / November 2014 issue

    These are some of the highlights of the past few weeks at Aquafeed.com

  • Coho salmon represents a significant part of global aquaculture

    October / November 2014 issue

    This is a brief outlook on the history and current situation of Coho salmon farming.

  • Shoud we just have Aquamongers?

    August / September 2014 issue

    In our last column we raised the issue taking the long term view highlighting that we must work together to benefit from increased seafood consumption. 

  • Be careful what you wish for

    August / September 2014 issue

    With the rise of the social media phenomenon and the growth of blogs, websites and chat rooms, anybody with an idea, a cause and time can gain an audience to express a point of view.

  • White, black or green tanks, what do fish larvae like best?

    August / September 2014 issue

    The intensive production of fish larvae depends on several abiotic and biotic factors that must be optimized to ensure successful production.

  • A Checklist of Financial Performance for Aquaculture Businesses

    August / September 2014 issue

    The previous Aquaculture Economics, Management, and Marketing column discussed the three pillars of financial performance for aquaculture businesses: cash flow, financial position, and profitability. 

  • Rainbow trout – the domestic animal among salmonids

    August / September 2014 issue

    Due to this species’ unique adaptability to different conditions and climates it has been spread worldwide.

  • Keys to Success: what you need to achieve, protect and verify aquatic animal health on the farm

    August / September 2014 issue

    There are four areas that are ‘keys to success’ in achieving and protecting aquatic animal health on the aquatic farm.

  • Latin America Update

    August / September 2014 issue

    Peruvian experts have created a software package, called Aquasoft, which allows the user to plan trout production based on the number of production cycles per year. 

  • ‘Talking Turkey’ about offshore mariculture… and maybe one day actually doing it!

    August / September 2014 issue

    We received a number of enthusiastic reports about the 2014 Offshore Mariculture Conference, which was held from 9-11 April, in Caserta, Naples, Italy.


  • Responsibility in fish feed production

    August / September 2014 issue

    The number of certification and standards bodies for the aquaculture production chain seems to be ever growing.

  • The Shellfish Corner

    June / July 2014 issue

    I welcome the return of Aquaculture Magazine and I’m grateful to be asked to follow in the rather large shadow of Dr. Kenneth K. Chew.

  • European aquaculture enters a new and promising stage

    June / July 2014 issue

    The expansion of aquaculture in the European Union (EU), both for finfish and shellfish, suffered a sudden change in its development trend at the beginning of the XXI century.

  • Inbreeding: It’s All Relative(s)

    June / July 2014 issue

    Many aquaculture producers share the ever-present suspicion that their production stocks are, or may become, “inbred.”

  • Current trends in Latin American Aquaculture

    June / July 2014 issue

    This issue’s contribution will focus on Peruvian, Honduran, and Mexican aquaculture.

  • Table talk from Aquaculture America 2014

    June / July 2014 issue

    Aquaculture America 2014 recently came and went at the Seattle Convention Center. According to Conference management, there were 1800 attendees from 62 countries who contributed to 606 oral and 132 poster presentations.

  • Probiotics inShrimp Aquaculture

    June / July 2014 issue

    Shrimp ranks as the most favorite seafood among US consumers, and more than half of the shrimp in the market are coming from aquaculture.

  • Aquafeed Report for March, 2014

    June / July 2014 issue

    As we all know, the development and growth of aquaculture is dependent on the availability of suitable feeds; the status of the aquafeed industry is therefore a good reflection of the health of aquaculture.

  • Feed Report

    February / March 2014 issue

    I am delighted to have been invited to contribute updates on aquafeed in Aquaculture Magazine and look forward to sharing news about this vital area of the industry.

     

  • Latin America Report

    February / March 2014 issue

    It is estimated that world production of fisheries and aquaculture will reach 172 million tons by 2021, driven by rapid economic growth and people moving towards healthier eating.

  • Nutrition

    February / March 2014 issue

    Welcome to the Nutrition column!  Let’s begin with a saying my students have described as Brown’s rule #1.  If you are going to grow an animal, you must provide adequate food resources. 

     

  • Tilapia

    February / March 2014 issue

    An American Tilapia Survivor Speaks Out Again, 23 years later... Tilapia fillet history 1992-1999.

  • Offshore Aquaculture

    February / March 2014 issue

    I care not what we call it. Open ocean aquaculture… offshore mariculture… these terms are often conflated and confounded, interchanged and intertwined.

  • Shellfish

    February / March 2014 issue

    I am honored to have been invited by Editor in Chief Greg Lutz to take part in this renewal of Aquaculture Magazine.

  • Health Highlights

    February / March 2014 issue

    I am so excited to have this opportunity to contribute to and coordinate the “Health Highlights” column for Aquaculture Magazine. 

  • European Report

    February / March 2014 issue

    Since 1989, I have been involved in aquaculture production. I have worked in several fish farms in Spain and Ireland, both in hatcheries and ongrowing plants, mainly with Gilthead sea bream, European sea bass and Atlantic salmon, but also with new species such as Senegalese sole and Black spot sea bream.

  • Shrimp

    February / March 2014 issue

    Shrimp has always been my favorite research subject since I was at graduate school. I witnessed the impressive growth trajectory of the shrimp aquaculture industry in the past two decades with some highs and lows along the path, even though the annual growth rate dropped to 4.8% starting from 2006.

  • Post-harvest Issues

    February / March 2014 issue

    When Greg Lutz first asked if I would be interested in writing a column on post-harvest issues in aquaculture, I jumped at the opportunity.

  • Aquaculture Engineering

    February / March 2014 issue

    I would like to introduce myself and some of my approaches to the problems of aquaculture, and also address what I hope to cover in this column in the future. 

  • Hatchery Technology and Management

    February / March 2014 issue

    Dear enthusiastic aquaculturists:


  • Aquaculture Economics, Management, and Marketing

    February / March 2014 issue

    Many different disciplines are important, in a variety of ways, to successful growth, development and expansion of aquaculture industries. However, when taken together economics, management, and marketing determine whether aquaculture businesses will be successful and whether industries will grow or languish. 

  • Salmonids

    February / March 2014 issue

    Over the last 40 years, I have followed farming of salmonids from the first attempts to feed a few wild-caught trout and salmon in captivity with more and less homemade feed to become a significant international food industry.